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Jeri Ryan Is a ‘Star Trek’ Icon—and One of the Most Important Political Figures of Our Time

A nice interview at The Daily Beast:

Jeri Ryan is still haunted by those five little words. “It’s the scene that I’ve always hated,” she says with a sigh. “The notorious Then you wish to copulate? scene. Hated everything about it. It was so on the nose, so gratuitous. I haven’t gone back to watch any of it.”

It occurred in “Revulsion,” the fifth episode of Star Trek: Voyager’s fourth season. Ryan’s Seven of Nine, a statuesque Borg in a silver, form-fitting catsuit, attempts to seduce Harry Kim, the Operations Officer of Starfleet’s USS Voyager. After an extended monologue on the nature of human sexuality, she asks that he remove his clothes; he panics, stammering awkwardly. They remain friends.

“That scene annoys me so much, because it stands against what this character was. She was completely asexual and innocent, and had no clue,’ offers Ryan. “I remember saying, We’ve really got to slow this down. So we pulled it back after that.”

She adds, “Plus the catsuit was a pain in the ass. I had to have someone dress me and undress me all the time, and it was a 20-minute production shutdown to go to the bathroom.”

When Ryan joined the cast of Voyager in Season 4, the show’s ratings reportedly jumped 60 percent. “I’ve heard that,” says a chuckling Ryan. “When they added the character, UPN made no bones about how this was their chance to break Star Trek into the mainstream, and so they put the publicity machine into overdrive.”

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Jeri Ryan On Seven As A Badass And Sharing Borgness With Locutus On ‘Star Trek: Picard’

trekmovie.com posted a summary of Jeri’s interview in the new Star Trek: Picard Podcast:

 

Jeri Ryan returned to Star Trek: Picard in episode nine, marking her fourth appearance for the new series as Seven of Nine. In a new podcast the actress and executive producer/director Akiva Goldsman discuss the episode and Seven’s arc: past, present and maybe even future.

Ryan on Seven’s ‘badass’ return and how ‘Picard’ is different than ‘Voyager’

On the official Star Trek: Picard Podcast the actress started off talking broadly about her return to the role of Seven of Nine:

This character was never one I thought about revisiting. I thought I was completely done, that was it. So, just the idea of what they were going to do with this character was interesting and exciting to me, and a big enough miracle. The fact that they lived up to all the promises is almost unheard of and amazing to me as an actor. She has been so much fun to revisit and so much fun to play. She has been through hell – I love how resilient she is. I love that storyline.

Continue reading Jeri Ryan On Seven As A Badass And Sharing Borgness With Locutus On ‘Star Trek: Picard’

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Jeri Ryan Loves Who Star Trek’s Seven of Nine Has Become on Picard

Source: vulture.com

When Jeri Ryan’s Seven of Nine was introduced in the fourth-season premiere of Star Trek: Voyager back in 1997, she could seem at first blush like a character positioned as eye candy above all else. But that perception underestimates the much-needed energy and deeper thematic considerations that Seven injected into Voyager. Seven stands as one of the most fascinating characters in Star Trek lore for how she nudges at the parameters of humanity and demonstrates the strange, exhilarating aspects of finding one’s own identity apart from the larger forces that control our lives. Ryan played Seven in a highly formalized way, with regimented speech that belied her own curiosity, and launched the character into the imagination of countless fans who still consider her one of the most cherished aspects of Voyager, long after the show ended in 2001.

But the state of modern Hollywood almost requires that no property or character ever really ends. Which brings us to CBS All Access’s Star Trek: Picard, a meditative and occasionally thrilling new entry in the famed franchise that brings back The Next Generation’s iconic Jean-Luc Picard (Patrick Stewart), who is navigating a more dangerous universe where the image of Starfleet doesn’t inspire awe so much as doubt. The show has so far maintained a mix of new and old characters, reintroducing Seven of Nine at the end of episode four, after a righteous space battle in which her character handily expresses her skills. The subsequent episode, “Stardust City Rag,” proved to be a major step up for the series, in no small part because of the badass energy Seven brings.

This Seven is very different from the woman we last saw nearly 20 years ago, however — she’s more lived-in, more naturalistic, and hell-bent on vengeance. Ryan spoke to Vulture about the pressure of bringing such a beloved character back, and where Seven’s journey will go on Picard. Continue reading Jeri Ryan Loves Who Star Trek’s Seven of Nine Has Become on Picard

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Jeri Ryan on joining ‘Star Trek: Picard’: ‘Resistance was futile’

Source: nypost.com

Jeri Ryan has a Borg-like appraisal of joining the cast of “Star Trek: Picard.”

“Yeah, resistance was kind of futile, I guess,” Ryan tells The Post with a laugh. She’s reprising her “Star Trek: Voyager” role of Seven of Nine, the part-human, part-machine former Borg drone she played on that series from 1997 to 2001. Ryan is shocked by her own enthusiasm about Seven’s new life in the show, which picks up two decades after the “Voyager” storyline ended.

“It’s really a kind of delightful surprise to be excited to play her again,” she says of the character, who is now a bourbon-drinking vigilante Fenris Ranger with fewer mechanical Borg implants and a lot more swagger. “I thought that I was done. I’d said goodbye to her, and I’d moved on and that was it.” Continue reading Jeri Ryan on joining ‘Star Trek: Picard’: ‘Resistance was futile’

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STLV19: ‘Star Trek: Picard’ Panel Talks Seven’s New Voice, Riker’s Return, And More

Here are the Jeri bits of trekmovie’s STLV19 write up with Jeri Ryan, Jonathan Frakes and Jonathan Del Arco:

Ryan happy to lose Seven’s catsuit, but “freaked out” finding her new voice

Jeri Ryan revealed how returning to Star Trek started as casual conversations among friends that she didn’t think would ever go anywhere:

We were at the Hollywood Bowl and Johnny [Del Arco] was with me and one of the creators of the show – James Duff – who is a dear friend of ours, after about four glasses of champagne, he was like: “this might be a good time to bring this up, here is what I am thinking…” And he pitched an idea. The story is not the same story as he was originally thinking, but the way he had conceived of this character, is basically what he had described to me, and it sounded really cool. I thought yeah, that sounds fun but, whatever. This was like a year and a half ago, well over a year. So, I didn’t think anything of it, but every time I saw him again, he would mention again. Then cut to the Creative Arts Emmys [September 8, 2018] and Alex Kurtzman was there, and he mentioned it as well. And I thought: “oh, this might happen,” and it did.

Like Frakes, Ryan had some concerns returning to her Star Trek role, but hers seemed to be even more intense:

Honestly, it was freaking terrifying, and these two [Frakes and Del Arco] can attest to that! They both saved my ass! I was freaking out. She was a very specific character for four years on Voyager. There was a lot of growth, and all of that. She went from being a machine to learning to be human. But, particularly the way she moved and her voice, that was what I was really hung up on. Her voice didn’t change that much in four years. So, she had a stilted, very formal, very stylized way of speaking, at the end of Voyager. So, when I got the initial script, and from I knew from the original pitch with James [Duff] a year and a half ago, she is not the same Seven. She is much more human. She been on Earth for a long time, she has been through a lot. So, when I saw that initial script and as you saw “what the hell are you doing out here?” It’s a very, very different voice. And that is what was freaking me out.

Ryan revealed it was Del Arco who helped her through it:

So I was happy because Johnny [Del Arco] was working before I did and he said: “once you get in costume, it helps.” And it does. It informs the way the character moves and the way the character stands and that kind of thing. But, I was having a real hard time with her voice. I just couldn’t hear her in these lines. I couldn’t find it and it was really freaking me out to the point where my husband was like: “I have seen you get freaked out by a script, ever.” And so thank God this one [Jonathan Frakes] was directing my first two episodes. And Johnny [Del Arco] worked before I did, so he had just gone through all of this himself.

I was literally freaking out. I was bursting into tears: “I don’t know what her voice is! I can’t find her.” So, Johnny came over and we had lunch and read the script for like an hour and finally he just – I was so freaked out I couldn’t think clearly about it – he said after an hour: “just try this, what if…” The Borg have always been hated, they are universally hated because they were bad guys, they were tough. But, there’s other elements in this world with the Borg. And, what if she had to make the choice to be as human as possible, to survive, to sound as human and act as human as possible. Clearly, she is always going to look like a former Borg, because she has these implants that cant go away. So, what if she had to make that choice – a conscious choice – to sound as human as possible. And that’s all I needed. That’s what I needed! I just needed something for it to make sense as an actor as to why she would have that huge of a chance. Then it made sense to me. I was still freaking out in my first scene.

Jeri Ryan also talked about what it has been like to work with Patrick Stewart for the first time:

[Working with Patrick] is amazing. I don’t think I had actually ever met Patrick once over all these years, except some after party like eighteen years ago. He is lovely. I know most of the Next Gen cast better than I know my own cast [from Voyager]. I know these guys so well and I have seen them at so many shows over the years and we hang out. So, it’s funny that I know so much about him and I know him from the periphery. But he is lovely, he is just lovely. And of course, he is an incredible actor.

The show is using the same kind of secrecy on set as the J.J. Abrams Star Trek movies, including requiring Jeri Ryan to always wear a hooded cloak when outside of her trailer, including gloves. Ryan talked about how she was surprised it worked, revealing that earlier in the year they shot at Universal City Walk in Hollywood, which is a tourist destination and she would be driven around (cloaked and hooded) in a van between her trailer and set right next to the tour trams, and thinking at the time “this is so going to get out!”

Picard Analysis: Based on what Ryan said at STLV, it appears her first episode for Picard will be episode three, which is the first episode Frakes directed (based on what he told TrekMovie.com in an earlier interview). Ryan’s comments indicate Seven will appear in episode four, also directed by Frakes, and given her phrasing of “my first two episodes,” it seems as if Seven will appear in more than just those two directed by Frakes. As shown in the Comic-Con trailer, the Seven seen in Picard has adapted be more human, as a way to fit in, or assimilate.

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