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EXCERPT: Star Trek: Voyager – A Celebration

Incredibly, this year is Star Trek: Voyager’s 25th anniversary, and to mark the occasion Hero Collector books are releasing a massive retrospective book called Star Trek: Voyager  A Celebration. It’s a hefty tome, that involved more than 30 new interviews, including all the main cast members, and almost every writer and department head. The book is divided into chapters that cover all the main cast members, key episodes, aliens and the work of all the different departments. 

StarTrek.com has an exclusive extract to share – an abridged version of the Seven of Nine profile with contributions from Jeri Ryan and Brannon Braga.

You can read the except here: https://intl.startrek.com/news/excerpt-star-trek-voyager-a-celebration

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Jeri Ryan Previews the Layers of Her ‘Quirky’ Villain on ‘MacGyver’

A short interview with tvinsider.com:

She “had a ball” reviving her iconic Borg character Seven of Nine on CBS All Access’ recent Star Trek: Picard. Now Jeri Ryan (above) looks to keep the good times going with an arc on the rebooted action drama MacGyver.

Ryan makes her debut tonight as Gwendolyn Hayes, the maternal aunt of Phoenix Foundation operative Angus MacGyver (Lucas Till) — who never knew she existed! When Mac’s father, James (Tate Donovan), aka operative Oversight, is nearly killed, the trail leads back to Codex, the nefarious group Phoenix has been tracking. Surprise! Gwen — a former agent for Phoenix precursor DXS (Department of External Services) who was presumed dead — heads it!

Ryan previews the tense family meetup.

What was it about Gwen that made you want to play her?

Jeri Ryan: Part of it is [executive producer] Terry Matalas wrote [this episode], and I love him. He’s been a friend from our Star Trek: Voyager days. I like that Gwen is not your typical network-drama villain. She’s got a lot of layers. She’s a little more quirky. It’s not black and white with her. Her motives are noble, as far as things go. In her mind, she’s the hero — she’s saving the world.

Mac doesn’t agree.

He can’t argue with her science; it’s sound. I don’t want to give too much away. The biggest part of her struggle is to try to get him to understand her way of thinking and get him to support it.

What do she and Mac have in common?

Certainly the intelligence and the love of science and the savvy. She’s his mother’s sister. Genetics is a real thing.

His father never told Mac about her, but she’s always known about him?

Yes. She’s tracked him throughout his life and kept an eye on him. Her love for her nephew has always been there. He never knew his mom, so this pits his desire for family against his loyalty to his friends. We have some cool twists.

MacGyver, Fridays, 8/7c, CBS

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Jeri Ryan Is a ‘Star Trek’ Icon—and One of the Most Important Political Figures of Our Time

A nice interview at The Daily Beast:

Jeri Ryan is still haunted by those five little words. “It’s the scene that I’ve always hated,” she says with a sigh. “The notorious Then you wish to copulate? scene. Hated everything about it. It was so on the nose, so gratuitous. I haven’t gone back to watch any of it.”

It occurred in “Revulsion,” the fifth episode of Star Trek: Voyager’s fourth season. Ryan’s Seven of Nine, a statuesque Borg in a silver, form-fitting catsuit, attempts to seduce Harry Kim, the Operations Officer of Starfleet’s USS Voyager. After an extended monologue on the nature of human sexuality, she asks that he remove his clothes; he panics, stammering awkwardly. They remain friends.

“That scene annoys me so much, because it stands against what this character was. She was completely asexual and innocent, and had no clue,’ offers Ryan. “I remember saying, We’ve really got to slow this down. So we pulled it back after that.”

She adds, “Plus the catsuit was a pain in the ass. I had to have someone dress me and undress me all the time, and it was a 20-minute production shutdown to go to the bathroom.”

When Ryan joined the cast of Voyager in Season 4, the show’s ratings reportedly jumped 60 percent. “I’ve heard that,” says a chuckling Ryan. “When they added the character, UPN made no bones about how this was their chance to break Star Trek into the mainstream, and so they put the publicity machine into overdrive.”

Continue reading Jeri Ryan Is a ‘Star Trek’ Icon—and One of the Most Important Political Figures of Our Time

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Jeri Ryan On Seven As A Badass And Sharing Borgness With Locutus On ‘Star Trek: Picard’

trekmovie.com posted a summary of Jeri’s interview in the new Star Trek: Picard Podcast:

 

Jeri Ryan returned to Star Trek: Picard in episode nine, marking her fourth appearance for the new series as Seven of Nine. In a new podcast the actress and executive producer/director Akiva Goldsman discuss the episode and Seven’s arc: past, present and maybe even future.

Ryan on Seven’s ‘badass’ return and how ‘Picard’ is different than ‘Voyager’

On the official Star Trek: Picard Podcast the actress started off talking broadly about her return to the role of Seven of Nine:

This character was never one I thought about revisiting. I thought I was completely done, that was it. So, just the idea of what they were going to do with this character was interesting and exciting to me, and a big enough miracle. The fact that they lived up to all the promises is almost unheard of and amazing to me as an actor. She has been so much fun to revisit and so much fun to play. She has been through hell – I love how resilient she is. I love that storyline.

Continue reading Jeri Ryan On Seven As A Badass And Sharing Borgness With Locutus On ‘Star Trek: Picard’

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Jeri Ryan Loves Who Star Trek’s Seven of Nine Has Become on Picard

Source: vulture.com

When Jeri Ryan’s Seven of Nine was introduced in the fourth-season premiere of Star Trek: Voyager back in 1997, she could seem at first blush like a character positioned as eye candy above all else. But that perception underestimates the much-needed energy and deeper thematic considerations that Seven injected into Voyager. Seven stands as one of the most fascinating characters in Star Trek lore for how she nudges at the parameters of humanity and demonstrates the strange, exhilarating aspects of finding one’s own identity apart from the larger forces that control our lives. Ryan played Seven in a highly formalized way, with regimented speech that belied her own curiosity, and launched the character into the imagination of countless fans who still consider her one of the most cherished aspects of Voyager, long after the show ended in 2001.

But the state of modern Hollywood almost requires that no property or character ever really ends. Which brings us to CBS All Access’s Star Trek: Picard, a meditative and occasionally thrilling new entry in the famed franchise that brings back The Next Generation’s iconic Jean-Luc Picard (Patrick Stewart), who is navigating a more dangerous universe where the image of Starfleet doesn’t inspire awe so much as doubt. The show has so far maintained a mix of new and old characters, reintroducing Seven of Nine at the end of episode four, after a righteous space battle in which her character handily expresses her skills. The subsequent episode, “Stardust City Rag,” proved to be a major step up for the series, in no small part because of the badass energy Seven brings.

This Seven is very different from the woman we last saw nearly 20 years ago, however — she’s more lived-in, more naturalistic, and hell-bent on vengeance. Ryan spoke to Vulture about the pressure of bringing such a beloved character back, and where Seven’s journey will go on Picard. Continue reading Jeri Ryan Loves Who Star Trek’s Seven of Nine Has Become on Picard

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